Meet Sreelakshmi Babu

Email: [email protected]

Academic and Industrial affiliations: Newcastle University/The University of Sheffield, Northumbrian Water, Scottish Water

Title of research project: The future of wastewater-based epidemiology

Wastewater based epidemiology (WBE) is a strategic approach for health protection that employs the analysis of wastewater to determine the prevalence of chemicals, infectious diseases, and other anthropogenic indicators in mass populations. WBE works on the principle that any substance or compound excreted by humans or animals, if adequately stable in wastewater, can be quantified, such that one can back-calculate original concentrations produced or consumed by the service population. The use of WBE for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) monitoring is among the recent applications and is being promoted around the world. AMR has been identified by medical professionals and public health specialists as a ‘silent’ or ‘the next’ pandemic.

The main objective of this project is to identify AMR using wastewater epidemiology in hospital wastewater. The experimental work includes DNA extraction from hospital wastewater and quantifying the antimicrobial genes (ARGs). It will also involve finding the optimum sampling distance and sampling quantity to find the hotspots for AMR. The data obtained will help find correlations between antibiotics used and specific ARGs depending on the sampling distance from hospitals. This will support Health Departments and other governing bodies to identify AMR hotspots and change management strategies. WBE data obtained will help water companies to modify treatment techniques and monitoring strategies.

Publications

Research Outputs

CDT WIRe students actively contribute to research on water infrastructure and resilience. Here, you will find recently published research by our researchers.

OutputsNo.
Peer Reviewed Journal Publications14
Conference Presentations50

Journal Publications

Title: Constructed wetlands as nature-based solutions in managing per-and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS): Evidence, mechanisms, and modelling

Authors: Pinelopi Savvidou, Gabriela Dotro, Pablo Campo, Frederic Coulon, and Tao Lyu

Published In: Science of The Total Environment

 

Read here.

 

Abstract

Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have emerged as newly regulated micropollutants, characterised by extreme recalcitrance and environmental toxicity. Constructed wetlands (CWs), as a nature-based solution, have gained widespread application in sustainable water and wastewater treatment and offer multiple environmental and societal benefits. Despite CWs potential, knowledge gaps persist in their PFAS removal capacities, associated mechanisms, and modelling of PFAS fate. This study carried out a systematic literature review, supplemented by unpublished experimental data, demonstrating the promise of CWs for PFAS removal from the influents of varying sources and characteristics. Median removal performances of 64, 46, and 0% were observed in five free water surface (FWS), four horizontal subsurface flow (HF), and 18 vertical flow (VF) wetlands, respectively. PFAS adsorption by the substrate or plant root/rhizosphere was deemed as a key removal mechanism. Nevertheless, the available dataset resulted unsuitable for a quantitative analysis. Data-driven models, including multiple regression models and machine learning-based Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), were employed to predict PFAS removal. These models showed better predictive performance compared to various mechanistic models, which include two adsorption isotherms. The results affirmed that artificial intelligence is an efficient tool for modelling the removal of emerging contaminants with limited knowledge of chemical properties. In summary, this study consolidated evidence supporting the use of CWs for mitigating new legacy PFAS contaminants. Further research, especially long-term monitoring of full-scale CWs treating real wastewater, is crucial to obtain additional data for model development and validation.

Title: A validated reverse-phase LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of haloacetic acids in drinking water: supporting the transition from HAA5 to HAA9

Authors: Polly L. Grundy, Peter R. Jarvis, Bruce Jefferson, John Fawell, John A. Haley, Emma H. Goslan

Published In: H2Open Journal

 

Read here.

 

Abstract

Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are potentially toxic by-products formed from interactions between organic matter and chlorine during disinfection of drinking water, with brominated HAAs forming when bromide is present. Some countries require monitoring of drinking water for five HAAs, but there is increasing health concern related to the more toxic brominated HAAs and monitoring of nine HAAs (HAA9) is becoming more widespread. However, existing methods of analysis for HAA9 are often sub-optimal, involving complex derivatisation steps and/or long analytical run times. This article presents an improved methodology utilising reverse-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for which sample preparation involves simple pH adjustment and the analytical run takes 10 min. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by a full validation across four drinking water matrices with good sensitivity (<0.8 μg/L), precision (<7%), and bias (<10%) observed. A direct comparison using real water samples was performed against the widely used existing gas chromatography method. The new LC-MS/MS method was significantly quicker and easier and demonstrated improved performance in terms of accuracy and precision. This has implications for understanding the risk posed by HAAs in chlorinated water by eliminating the possible historical under-estimates of the levels of the more toxic brominated compounds.

Title: A cost-benefit ‘source-receptor’ framework for implementation of Blue-Green flood risk management 

Authors: Christos Iliadis, Vassilis Glenis, Chris Kilsby

Published In: Journal of Hydrology

Read here.

 

 

 

Abstract

As floods are a major and growing source of risk in urban areas, there is a necessity to improve flood risk management frameworks and civil protection through planning interventions that modify surface flow pathways and introduce storage. Despite the complexity of densely urbanised areas (topography, buildings, green spaces, roads), modern flood models can represent urban features and flow characteristics in order to help researchers, local authorities, and insurance companies to develop and improve efficient flood risk frameworks to achieve resilience in cities. A cost-benefit driven ‘source-receptor’ flood risk framework is developed in this study to identify (1) locations contributing to surface flooding (sources), (2) buildings and locations at high flood risk (receptors), (3) the cost-benefit nexus between the ‘source’ and the ‘receptor’, and finally (4) ways to mitigate flooding at the ‘receptor’ by adding Blue-Green Infrastructure (BGI) in critical locations. The analysis is based on five steps to identify the ‘source’ and the ‘receptor’ in a study area based on the flood exposure of buildings, damages arising from flooding and available green spaces with the best potential to add sustainable and resilient solutions to reduce flooding. The framework was developed using the detailed hydrodynamic model CityCAT in a case study of the city centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. The novelty of this analysis is that firstly, multiple storm magnitudes (i.e. small and large floods) are used combined with a method to locate the areas and the buildings at flood risk and a prioritized set of best places to add interventions upstream and downstream. Secondly, planning decisions are informed by considering the benefit from reduced damages to properties and the cost to construct resilient BGI options rather than a restricted hydraulic analysis considering only flood depths and storages in isolation from real world economics.

Title: A dynamic framework to align company climate reporting and action with global climate targets

Authors: Anna ChristyMarwa ElnahassJaime AmezagaAnthony BrowneOliver Heidrich

Published In: Business Strategy and the Environment (2024)

Read here.

Abstract

There are global aspirations to reach net zero emissions, which triggered the development of standards, guidance and tools to measure and manage climate action across countries, sectors and companies. However, carbon accounting inaccuracies, ambiguous emissions disclosures and unambitious climate targets are hampering these aspirations. This paper reports on the disparity between high-level guidance and practical implementation of carbon accounting and reporting at company level. By conducting a systematic literature analysis and focussing on the English Water sector, we utilise case study data from Northumbrian Water Limited (NWL), to identify limitations in the current guidance and frameworks. The results indicate the necessity for enhanced alignment in high-level guidance, particularly regarding the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and the Science-Based Target Initiative. It is evident that clarity and consistency from high-level resources are essential for climate mitigation. This paper shows, depending on the sector and company types, that different benefits are gained from using the available resources. We propose a carbon measurement and management process for the English Water sector (and beyond) to reach net zero targets and make recommendations for decision makers. This helps to understand best practices of carbon accounting and reporting and to make effective investment decisions. Consequently, we advocate for policy interventions to improve the standardisation of carbon accounting models. Harmonising international regulatory frameworks and standards is needed, which will empower organisations to effectively assess, manage and reduce their carbon footprints.

Title: A data quality assessment framework for drinking water distribution system water quality time series datasets

Authors: Killian Gleeson, Stewart Husband, John Gaffney, and Joby Boxall

Published In: AQUA – Water Infrastructure, Ecosystems and Society (2023)

Read here.

Abstract

The derivation of information from monitoring drinking water quality at high spatiotemporal resolution as it passes through complex, ageing distribution systems is limited by the variable data quality from the sensitive scientific instruments necessary. A framework is developed to overcome this. Application to three extensive real-world datasets, consisting of 92 multi-parameter water quality time series of data taken from different hardware configurations, shows how the algorithms can provide quality-assured data and actionable insight. Focussing on turbidity and chlorine, the framework consists of three steps to bridge the gap between data and information; firstly, an automated rule-based data quality assessment is developed and applied to each water quality sensor, then, cross-correlation is used to determine spatiotemporal relationships and finally, spatiotemporal information enables multi-sensor data quality validation. The framework provides a method to achieve automated data quality assurance, applicable to both historic and online datasets, such that insight and actionable insight can be gained to help ensure the supply of safe, clean drinking water to protect public health.

Title: The influence of 4D landscape visualisation on attitudes to reservoir renaturalisation

Authors: Daryl Hughes, Geoff Parkin, Jaime Amezaga, Andy Large, Kat Liney, Alice Senior, Alethea Goddard

Published In: Landscape and Urban Planning, 221, p.104372

Read more here.

 

Abstract

Landscapes change due to natural processes and anthropogenic influences such as farming, forestry, urban development and civil engineering. Sustainable land and water management is needed to meet human needs while responding to the climate and biodiversity crises. Landscape visualisation may facilitate this by improving stakeholder engagement and changing environmental baselines. We developed a 4D landscape visualisation of the Crummock Water catchment in England’s Lake District National Park. It showed 14,000 years of landscape evolution, including 140 years of reservoir engineering and future renaturalisation scenarios (weir removal and river remeandering). We used a cognitive model novel to landscape visualisation research to understand stakeholder values, beliefs, and attitudes. We tested the hypotheses that presenting extended landscape evolution information changes stakeholder beliefs (H1) and attitudes (H2) towards the renaturalisation proposals. The experiment comprised online visualisation workshops with 45 participants in two treatments (‘long’ extended and ‘short’ control). We analysed pre- and post-workshop surveys using statistical tests and qualitative coding. Results show the workshop changed beliefs around landscape naturalness, and made attitudes towards renaturalisation more supportive. There was no significant difference in belief between treatments, therefore we reject our belief hypothesis (H1). However, participants who saw the extended information were more likely to support weir removal, supporting our attitude hypothesis (H2). We discuss the validity of the cognitive model and the utility of the extended landscape evolution information. We conclude that 4D landscape visualisation can change beliefs about landscapes and attitudes towards environmental management. This effect may be enhanced by extended landscape evolution information.

Title: Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves at Ungauged Sites in a Changing Climate for Sustainable Stormwater Networks

Authors: Panagiota Galiatsatou, Christos Iliadis

Published In: MDPI Sustainability, 2022

Read here.

  

 

 

Abstract

Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves representing the variation of the magnitude of extreme rainfall events with a return period and storm duration are widely used in hydrologic infrastructure design, flood risk management projects, and climate change impact studies. However, in many locations worldwide, short-duration rainfall-observing sites with long records do not exist. This paper introduces a new methodological framework for extracting IDF curves at ungauged sites transferring information from gauged ones with a relatively homogeneous extreme rainfall climate. This methodology is grounded on a simple scaling concept based on the multifractal behaviour of rainfall. A nonstationary Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution fitted to annual rainfall monthly maxima at the ungauged site using a moving-time window approach is also applied to consider effects of a changing climate on IDF curve construction. An application is presented at the study site of Fourni, Crete, to derive IDF curves under changing climate conditions and present implications of the proposed methodology in the design of a sustainable stormwater network. The methodology introduced in this work results in increased rainfall extremes up to 20.5%, while the newly designed stormwater network is characterised by increased diameters of its primary conduits, compared to the ones resulting under fully stationary conditions.

Title: Investigating Variability in Microbial Fuel Cells

Authors: Daniel David Leicester, Sam Settle, Clare M. McCann, Elizabeth Susan Heidrich

Published In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 89(3), pp.e02181-22

Read more here.

 

Abstract

In scientific studies, replicas should replicate, and identical conditions should produce very similar results which enable parameters to be tested. However, in microbial experiments which use real world mixed inocula to generate a new “adapted” community, this replication is very hard to achieve. The diversity within real-world microbial systems is huge, and when a subsample of this diversity is placed into a reactor vessel or onto a surface to create a biofilm, stochastic processes occur, meaning there is heterogeneity within these new communities. The smaller the subsample, the greater this heterogeneity is likely to be. Microbial fuel cells are typically operated at a very small laboratory scale and rely on specific communities which must include electrogenic bacteria, known to be of low abundance in most natural inocula. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer a unique opportunity to investigate and quantify variability as they produce current when they metabolize, which can be measured in real time as the community develops. In this research, we built and tested 28 replica MFCs and ran them under identical conditions. The results showed high variability in terms of the rate and amount of current production. This variability perpetuated into subsequent feeding rounds, both with and without the presence of new inoculate. In an attempt to control this variability, reactors were reseeded using established “good” and “bad” reactors. However, this did not result in replica biofilms, suggesting there is a spatial as well as a compositional control over biofilm formation.

Title: Impact of resin loading on ion exchange equilibrium for removal of organic matter and inorganic ions

Authors: Lucie Pidoux, Holly Shorney-Darby, Elisabeth Vaudevire, Bram Martijn, Peter Jarvis, Irene Carra

Published In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2022

Read here.

 

 

Abstract

Ion Exchange (IEX) applications for drinking water can be limited due to high volumes of brine, brine waste and treated water corrosivity. Reusing the resin by operating at reduced regeneration frequency can overcome this. However, assessing changes on the resin loading over reuse cycles is complex because multiple presaturant ions participate in the exchange and existing models only account for the exchange with one presaturant ion. This study developed a theoretical multicomponent model for the determination of IEX equilibria when the resin loading increases due to reuse. The model suggested that both electrostatic interactions and admicelle formation were the separation mechanisms. The model revealed that under reduced regeneration frequencies, brine use and waste generation can be reduced by more than 90%, where the bicarbonate-form resin offered the potential for lower corrosivity. However, changes in resin loading after 5 reuse cycles showed that the risk of corrosion increased. For the tested source water, reusing the bicarbonate-form resin every 5 cycles would achieve the most sustainable option with 41% NOM removal and 79% brine and waste reduction. Under these conditions, almost 100% of exchange capacity is recovered after regeneration.

Title: Urban Flood Modelling under Extreme Rainfall Conditions for Building-Level Flood Exposure Analysis

Authors: Christos Iliadis, Panagiota Galiatsatou, Vassilis Glenis, Panagiotis Prinos, Chris Kilsby

Published In: Journal of Flood Risk Management

Read here

 

 

Abstract

The expansion of urban areas and the increasing frequency and magnitude of intense rainfall events are anticipated to contribute to the widespread escalation of urban flood risk across the globe. To effectively mitigate future flood risks, it is crucial to combine a comprehensive examination of intense rainfall events in urban areas with the utilization of detailed hydrodynamic models. This study combines extreme value analysis techniques applied to rainfall data ranging from sub-hourly to daily durations with a high-resolution flood modelling analysis at the building level in the centre of Thessaloniki, Greece. A scaling procedure is employed to rainfall return levels assessed by applying the generalised extreme value (GEV) distribution to annual maximum fine-temporal-scale data, and these scaling laws are then applied to more reliable daily rainfall return levels estimated by means of the generalised Pareto distribution (GPD), in order to develop storm profiles with durations of 1 h and 2 h. The advanced flood model, CityCAT, is then used for the simulation of pluvial flooding, providing reliable assessments of building-level exposure to flooding hazards. The results of the analysis conducted provide insights into flood depths and water flowpaths in the city centre of Thessaloniki, identifying major flowpaths along certain main streets resulting in localised flooding, and identifying around 165 and 186 buildings highly exposed to inundation risk in the study area for 50-year storm events with durations of 1 h and 2 h, respectively. For the first time in this study area, a detailed analysis of extreme rainfall events is combined with a high-resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM), used as an input into the advanced and fully featured CityCAT hydrodynamic model, to assess critical flowpaths and buildings at high flood risk. The results of this study can aid in the planning and design of resilient solutions to combat urban flash floods, as well as contribute to targeted flood damage mitigation and flood risk reduction.

 

Title: Assessing heavy metal contamination and ecological risk of urban topsoils in Tarkwa, Ghana

Authors: Linda Bentuma Osei, Shadrack Fosu, Samuel Agyarko Ndur & Samuel Yeboah Nyarko

Published In: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Read here.

 

 

 

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the spatial distribution, contamination levels, pollution degree and ecological risks of eight heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in topsoils of UMaT, Brahabobom, A’koon, Boboobo and Bogoso Junction (areas in Tarkwa, a mining town in Ghana). Eighty soil samples were collected, and metal concentrations were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results revealed that Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations exceeded the WHO/FAO (2001) standard in some areas. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo) value of metals in soils under study revealed extreme contamination by Pb and Mn; however, Mn was in abundance due to the presence of Mn minerals in the study area. The study area was also moderately contaminated by Cd, Cu and Zn. Cd and Pb posed a considerable and very high potential ecological risk to the study area, respectively, especially at Bogoso Junction. The two metals were mainly from vehicular traffic and the activities of auto mechanics at Bogoso Junction. Nemerow’s pollution index also revealed that about 20% of the study area was polluted, mainly from Cu and Pb concentrations.

 

 

Title: Representing buildings and urban features in hydrodynamic flood models

Authors: Christos Iliadis et al.,

Published In: Journal of Flood Risk Management (DOI: 10.1111/JFR3.12950)

Read here.

 

 

Abstract

Flood risk in cities and built-up areas is a major threat which is likely to grow due to increased urbanization and climate change. It is a priority for urban planning, civil defence, and insurance to accurately represent buildings and urban features in hydrodynamic models to assess flood risk to people, properties, assets, and infrastructure in an uncertain future. The correct representation of urban features in models is currently blocked by the lack of detailed and accurate techniques and has become a priority for the improvement of urban flood modelling now that better data and computational resources are available. This study has reviewed the available approaches for the representation of buildings and urban features and implemented the widely used “stubby building” approximation as well as a more realistic and innovative “building hole” approach using the hydrodynamic model CityCAT. The city centre of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, was used as a case study, allowing independent validation of the methods and direct, systematic comparison of performance. Shortcomings of the approximate method are described, and guidance given on limits to its reliable application and scope for improvement.

 

Title: Cloud Modelling of Property-Level Flood Exposure in Megacities

Authors: Christos Iliadis et al.,

Published In: MDPI

Read here.

 

 

Abstract

Surface water flood risk is projected to increase worldwide due to the growth of cities as well as the frequency of extreme rainfall events. Flood risk modelling at high resolution in megacities is now feasible due to the advent of high spatial resolution terrain data, fast and accurate hydrodynamic models, and the power of cloud computing platforms. Analysing the flood exposure of urban features in these cities during multiple storm events is essential to understanding flood risk for insurance and planning and ultimately for designing resilient solutions. This study focuses on London, UK, a sprawling megacity that has experienced damaging floods in the last few years. The analysis highlights the key role of accurate digital terrain models (DTMs) in hydrodynamic models. Flood exposure at individual building level is evaluated using the outputs from the CityCAT model driven by a range of design storms of different magnitudes, including validation with observations of a real storm event that hit London on the 12 July 2021. Overall, a novel demonstration is presented of how cloud-based flood modelling can be used to inform exposure insurance and flood resilience in cities of any size worldwide, and a specification is presented of what datasets are needed to achieve this aim.

Title: Multiaxial fatigue of water pipe grey cast iron

Authors: Edward John et al.,

Published In: International Journal of Fatigue

Read here.

 

Abstract

Grey Cast Iron (GCI) water pipes are subject to multiaxial, cyclic stresses caused by combinations of loads such as internal water pressure and road vehicle weight. However, the multiaxial fatigue performance of this material has not previously been characterised. To address this gap more than 45 fatigue tests, including some under non-proportional tension-torsion loading, were completed using a GCI material very similar to water pipe GCI. Of the four multiaxial fatigue criteria tested, the Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) criterion provided the best predictions by a narrow margin, supporting the idea that a tensile cracking mode dominates the fatigue life of GCI.

Conference Presentations

Title: Extreme rainfall and 2D flood modelling in urban catchments to assess flood exposure of buildings. A case study in Thessaloniki city, Greece

Conference: 12th World Congress on Water Resources and Environment (EWRA 2023), Greece, 2023

Authors: Christos Iliadis et al.,

Title: Material and Biofilm Accumulation in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

Conference: Water Quality Technology Conference & Exposition, 2023, USA

Authors: Jade Rogers et al.,

Title: Influencing shower behaviour using real time feedback and goal-based messaging

Conference: 11th IWA Efficient Urban Water Management Conference, 2023, France

Authors: Harry Nicklin et al.,

Title: Understanding Cryptosporidium trends in a large UK catchment

Conference: 40th International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) Conference, 2023, Austria

Authors: Alan Smalley et al.,

Title: The role of hydrogen for a resilient and low-emissions UK water sector

Conference: 9th IWA Aspire Conference & Exhibition 2023, Taiwan

Authors: Ravina Bains et al.,

Title: Impact of experimentally determined grey cast iron pipe fatigue strength variation on years-to-leakage predictions

Conference: 19th International Computing and Control for the Water Industry Conference (CCWI), 2023, Leicster, UK

Authors: Edward John et al.,

Title: Plain and notch fatigue strength of water pipe grey cast iron

Conference: 17th International Conference on Engineering Structural Integrity Assessment and 2023 International Symposium on Structural Integrity (ESIA17–ISSI2023), 2023, Manchester, UK

Authors: Edward John et al.,

Title: Chomping into the attitude-behaviour gap: using smart sensors and goal setting to influence shower behaviour

Conference: SWIG Sensing in Water 2023

Authors: Harry Nicklin et al.,

Title: Developing biomarkers for tracking antimicrobial resistance in wastewater

Conference: The International Conference: Towards a Global Wastewater Surveillance System for Public Health, 2023

Authors: Sreelakshmi Babu et al.,

Title: Understanding the Selective Removal of Organic Matter by Coagulation and Ion-exchange in Lowland Surface Water Treatment: Impact on Treatment and Operational Benefits

Conference: IWA 8th Specialist Conference on Natural Organic Matter (NOM 8), 2023 South Africa

Authors: Samuel Nyarko et al.,

Title: Consumer Demand in Intermittent Water Supply: A Case Study of Lahan, Nepal

Conference: 19th Computing and Control for the Water Industry (CCWI) Conference, 2023, Leicester UK

Authors: Matthew MacRorie et al.,

Title: Introduction of a Simple and Effective Analytical Method for Haloacetic Acids in Drinking Water by Reverse Phase LC-MS/MS

Conference: RSC Analytical Research Forum 2023, London

Authors: Polly Grundy et al.,

Title: Investigating the Chemistry of Brominated Disinfection By-Product Formation

Conference: UK Water Network Conference 2023

Authors: Polly Grundy et al.,

Title: NOM compositional impacts on coagulant demand and water treatability

Conference: IWA 8th Specialist Conference on Natural Organic Matter (NOM 8), 2023 South Africa

Authors: Daniel Ruth et al.,

Title: Using smart sensors with automatic timers to influence shower behaviour

Conference: Waterwise Conference 2023 – Running out of water – water efficiency’s key role in affordability, growth and resilience

Authors: Harry Nicklin et al.,

Title: Use of flow cytometry data to monitor biological stability in operational drinking water supply systems

Conference: 19th Computing and Control for the Water Industry Conference, 2023, UK

Authors: Isabel Carneiro et al.,

Title: TBC

Conference: 12th World Congress on Water Resources and Environment (EWRA 2023), Greece, 2023

Authors: Ali Leonard et al.,

Title: TBC

Conference: WWT Smart Water, 2023, UK

Authors: Killian Gleeson et al.,

Title: Quantification of wastewater resilience metrics

Conference: IWA Water Resource Recovery Modelling Seminar, 2023, South Africa

Authors: Anna Laino et al.,

Title: TBC

Conference: 11th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Industrial Ecology, 2023, The Netherlands

Authors: Anna Christy et al.,

Title: TBC

Conference: Watermatex, 2023, Canada

Authors: Anna Laino et al.,

Title: 

Conference: Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) Conference 2023

Authors: Clervie Genevois et al.,

Title: Modelling the fate of micropollutants during wastewater treatment

Conference: Cranfield Doctoral Network Annual Conference, 2023

Authors: Pinelopi Savvidou et al.,

Title: Modelling the fate of micropollutants during wastewater treatment: A critical review of the existing fate models

Conference: Early Career People in Water Conference 2022

Authors: Pinelopi Savvidou et al.,

Title: Modelling the Fate of Micropollutants during Wastewater Treatment: Status and Challenges

Conference: 10th Conference of the UK Wastewater Network, Cranfield University, 2022

Authors: Pinelopi Savvidou et al.,

Title: Determining the Spatio-Temporal Relationship Between Water Quality Monitors in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

At: 14th International Conference on Hydroinformatics – HIC 2022, Romania

Authors: Killian Gleeson et al.,

Title: 

At: Water Wastewater Environmental Monitoring Conference, 2022, UK

Authors: Killian Gleeson et al.,

Title: Monitoring the Right Parameters for the Enhanced Treatment of Natural Organic Matter Laden Water Sources

At: Water Quality Technology Conference, 2022, USA

Authors: Daniel Ruth et al.,

Title: When will it leak?: Investigating how fatigue cracking can cause grey cast iron pipes to leak

Conference: 2nd International Conference on Water Distribution System Analysis & Computing and Control in the Water Industry (WDSA/CCWI), 2022, Spain

Authors: Edward John et al.,

Title: Disinfection Residual Behaviour within Drinking Water Distribution Systems

Conference: 2nd International Conference on Water Distribution System Analysis & Computing and Control in the Water Industry (WDSA/CCWI), 2022, Spain

Authors: Jade Rogers et al.,

Title: A conceptual model of intermittent water supply (IWS)

Conference: 2nd International Conference on Water Distribution System Analysis & Computing and Control in the Water Industry (WDSA/CCWI), 2022, Spain

Authors: Matthew MacRorie et al.,

Title: A model of intermittent water supply simulating the inequitable distribution of water

Conference: 1st Water-WISER Early Career Researcher Conference, 2022, Loughborough UK

Authors: Matthew MacRorie et al.,

Title: The impact of drinking water network model spatial and temporal scale on hydraulic metrics indicating discolouration risk

Conference: 2nd International Conference on Water Distribution System Analysis & Computing and Control in the Water Industry (WDSA/CCWI), 2022, Spain

Authors: Reinar Lokk et al.,

Title: Geostatistical Approach to Understanding the Effect of Rainfall Spatial-Temporal Uncertainty on a Small Urban Hydraulic Model

Conference: 12th Urban Drainage Modelling Conference, 2022, USA

Authors: Philippa Mohan et al.,

Title: TBC

Conference: 25th European Junior Scientists Workshop on Monitoring Urban Drainage systems and rivers, 2022, France

Authors: Philippa Mohan et al.,

Title: Groundwater Resilience under Extreme Drought

Conference: Peter Wolf Symposium 2022

Authors: Ellie McGrady et al.,

Title: Heavy metal and ammonia mixture toxicity towards mixed electroactive biofilms

Conference: International Society for Microbial Electrochemistry and Technology ISMET8, 2022, Crete

Authors: Sam Settle et al.,

Title: 

Conference: Singapore International Water Week (SIWW), 2022, Singapore

Authors: Lucie Bertolaso et al.,

Title: 

Conference: 15th Conference of the UK Water Network on Potable Water Treatment and Supply, 2022, UK

Authors: Lucie Bertolaso et al.,

Title: 

Conference: International Ozone Association EA3G Conference, 2022, France

Authors: Lucie Bertolaso et al.,

Title: Contrasting Biological, Genetic And Chemical Markers For Triaging AMR Potential In Wastewater Monitoring For Health Protection

Conference: Environmental Dimension of Antibiotic Resistance (EDAR 6) Conference, 2022, Sweden

Authors: Sreelakshmi Babu et al.,

Title: Developing biomarkers for tracking antimicrobial resistance in wastewater

Conference: Environmental Biotechnology Network Conference, Edinburgh

Authors: Sreelakshmi Babu et al.,

Title: The role of hydrogen for a resilient and low-emissions UK water sector

Conference: 9th Conference of the UK Wastewater Network 2022

Authors: Ravina Bains et al.,

Title: Groundwater Resilience under Extreme Drought

Conference: Peter Wolf Symposium 2022

Authors: Ellie McGrady et al.,

Title: Influencing shower behaviour using automatic timers and goal-based messaging

Conference: CDT-Sustainable Infrastructure and Cities Conference

Authors: Harry Nicklin et al.,

Title: Achieving Biological Stability in Drinking Water Supply Systems

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Isabel Carneiro et al.,

Title: 

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Thomas Langshaw et al.,

Title: 

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Killian Gleeson et al.,

Title: Understanding how the deterioration of grey cast iron pipes evolves into leakage

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Edward John et al.,

Title: 

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Alethea Goddard et al.,

Title: 

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Ali Leonard et al.,

Title: The role of hydrogen for a resilient and low-emissions UK water sector

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Ravina Bains et al.,

Title: Controlling Water Chemistry to Minimise Brominated Disinfection By-Products

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Polly Grundy et al.,

Title: 

Conference: UKWIR Annual Conference 2022

Authors: Dimitris Athanasopoulos et al., 

Our Researchers

Cohort I – September 2019 intake

Dimitris Athanasopoulos-Tseles

Project Title: Eliminating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Wastewater Treatment

Host: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Severn Trent Water

Clervie Genevois

Project Title: Service Reservoir Integrity

Host: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Welsh Water

Killian Gleeson

Project Title: Drinking water distribution systems water quality big data analytics

Host: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Siemens

Alethea Goddard

Project Title: Promoting high quality and multifunctional green infrastructure

Host: Newcastle University

Sponsor: Northumbrian Water

Christos Iliadis

Project Title:  Improved flood modelling for the built environment and infrastructure – Achieving urban flood resilience through hydrodynamic models 

Host: Newcastle University

Rowan Pearce

Project Title: Delivering a Resilient Approach to Tertiary Phosphorus Removal from Wastewater

Host: Cranfield University

Sponsors: Anglian Water, Northumbrian Water, Scottish Water, Thames Water

Daniel Ruth

Project Title: Rapid process optimisation procedures and process selection methods for natural organic matter removal

Host: Cranfield University

Sponsors: Scottish Water

Cohort II – September 2020 intake

Ravina Bains

Project Title: Achieving Net-Zero – Hydrogen as a key factor for energy resilience and emission reduction for the UK water sector

Host: Cranfield University

Sponsors: Anglian Water, Scottish Water

Edward John

Project Title: Understanding how the deterioration of cast iron pipes evolves into leakage

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: UKWIR

Anna Laino

Project Title: Quantification of wastewater treatment resilience metrics

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsors: Scottish Water, Northumbrian Water

Thomas Langshaw

Project Title: The insidious impact of transients on leakage

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: UKWIR

Ali Leonard

Project Title: Multi-Scale Water Resources Planning in England & Wales

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: United Utilities

Reinar Lokk

Project Title: The Future of Hydraulic Water Network Design to Manage Discolouration Risk 

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: United Utilities

Matthew MacRorie

Project Title: Determining the impact of developing a 24/7 supply of drinking water on assets, communities and the environment in Nepal

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsors: Anglian Water, WaterAid UK

Philippa Mohan

Project Title: Development of risk-based investment decision making tools that account for predictive model uncertainty in Water Framework Directive studies

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Stantec

Harry Nicklin

Project Title: Understanding Domestic Water Use Behaviour

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Reckitt Benkiser (RB)

Charalampos Ntigkakis

Project Title: Groundwater modeling to simulate groundwater/surface water interactions

Host University: Newcastle University

Jade Rogers

Project Title: Managing biofilms and disinfection residuals to protecting drinking water safety

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Scottish Water

Sam Settle

Project Title: Developing large scale MECs for treatment of sludge return liquor

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: Northumbrian Water

Cohort III – September 2021 intake

Sreelakshmi Babu

Project Title: The future of wastewater-based epidemiology

Host: Newcastle University/The University of Sheffield

Sponsors: Northumbrian Water, Scottish Water

Isabel Carneiro Cardoso da Silva

Project Title: Achieving biologically stable / low AOC water in the UK

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: UKWIR

Anna Charatzidou

Project Title: Effects of microplastics on interactions between soil biota, soil structure and crop performance in sewage sludge-amended soils

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Scottish Water

Anna Christy

Project Title: Minimising whole life carbon emissions in a multi-site utility

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: Northumbrian Water

Polly Grundy

Project Title: Controlling water chemistry to improve drinking water quality and minimising disinfection by-products

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: UKWIR

Eleyna McGrady

Project Title: Resilience of Groundwater Resource under Severe Drought

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsors: Anglian Water, Northumbrian Water

Samuel Nyarko

Project Title: Securing drinking water supplies: the role of organic matter on water treatability

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsors: Anglian Water, Thames Water

Lucie Bertolaso

Project Title: Taking 20th Century water treatment assets into the mid 21st Century

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Anglian Water

Matthew Pitt

Project Title: The influence of tillage methods on water transport through the whole soil profile

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Affinity Water

Mark Powders

Project Title: Ammonia to energy: A key decarbonisation strategy for the water sector

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Northumbrian Water

Pinelopi Savvidou

Project Title: Wastewater Integrated Selection Environment: A UK Model comprising regulation, resilience and sustainability

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Atkins

Alan Smalley

Project Title: Real Time Forecasting of Catchment Water Quality to Improve Supply Resilience

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Thames Water, Severn Trent Water

Charlie Whitelegg

Project Title: Unlocking the potential of hydraulic transients as a source of information about water distribution networks

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsors: Scottish Water

Siqi Xu

Project Title: Resource and energy recovery from sewage sludge by optimised advanced thermal conversion process control

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Thames Water

Cohort IV – October 2022 intake

Andre Araujo Frota

Project Title: Catchments as the first stage of treatment

Host: Newcastle University

Sponsor: UKWIR

Raman Suri

Project Title: Ceramic nanofiltration: Creating a resilient future for drinking water supply

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsors: Scottish Water/ Welsh Water/ Anglian Water

Ishara Perera

Project Title: Data density to predictive power – Intelligent Water Distribution Systems

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Scottish Water

George Crowley

Project Title: Machine Learning Methods for Monitoring of Complex Water and Sewer Network Infrastructure

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Thames Water

Kaeli Brazier

Project Title: Understanding the risks associated with contaminated floodwater from urban drainage systems

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: Incorporated – EU research project

Zachary Thompson

Project Title: Quantifying and Abating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Large Wastewater Treatment Plants

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: Northumbrian Water Limited

Ana Amezaga-Kutija

Project Title: Proactive management of dissolved organic carbon in catchments to mitigate climate change impacts on trihalomethanes formation in water treatment

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: Northumbrian Water Ltd

Jennifer Hollands

Project Title: Disrupting disruptions: Drinking water treatment resilience to chemical shortages

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsors: Anglian Water/Thames Water

Anne Wairimu Kamau

Project Title: Understanding the role of nitrogen in the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water treatment systems

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: UKWIR

Blessing Mobolaji

Project Title: Nitrous oxide management in a novel biological process

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: Anglian Water

Cohort V – October 2023 intake

Cerith Rhys-Morgan

Project Title: Persistent droughts and water supply system risk in a changing climate

Host: Newcastle University

Sponsor: EPSRC/United Utilities

Fran Wilson

Project Title: Monitoring and Evaluation of Vegetated Stormwater Infrastructure (STW)

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsors: EPSRC/Severn Trent Water

Freya Thornley

Project Title: Integrated biological system design of catchment systems for non-point pollution control

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: Newcastle University

Gareth Cotton

Project Title: Data Driven Control of Urban Drainage Systems (EMS)

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: EPSRC/EMS

Hannah Wright

Project Title: Investigating the Impact of Climate Change on River Water Quality to Secure Future Water Supplies

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: EPSRC/Northumbrian Water

Mohammad Reza Shekofteh

Project Title: Proactive Water Network Management

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: EPSRC/Northumbrian Water

Muna Hassan

Project Title: Supressing Greenhouse Gases Emissions from Sewage Sludge Treatment – Supporting the Water Industry Meeting Net-Zero

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsor: EPSRC

Rachael Giles

Project Title: Biological Coagulant Recovery for Resilient and Sustainable Water and Wastewater Treatment

Host University: Cranfield University

Sponsors: EPSRC/Thames Water/Welsh Water/United Utilities/Scottish Water/Severn Trent Water

Roman Tijsseling

Project Title: Managing Strategic Infrastructure To Ensure Safe Drinking Water

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: EPSRC/South Staffordshire Water

Tomas Hotzel Escardo

Project Title: Advanced Sensing and AI for Risk Detection in Rail Environments

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: The University of Sheffield/Network Rail

Uzayr Soni

Project Title: The impact of sample line biofilms on drinking water quality and microbial compliance

Host University: The University of Sheffield

Sponsor: EPSRC/Severn Trent Water/Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water/Scottish Water/Anglian Water

Vladislav Dmitrievich Dukhovskoy

Project Title: City-scale strategies for urban drainage to regulate quantity and quality of flow

Host University: Newcastle University

Sponsor: EPSRC/ Northumbrian Water