PhD projects For October 2019 start

at Cranfield University

Sustainable Fats, Oils and Greases Management for the Future

Sponsored by Thames Water

 The detrimental impacts of fats, oils and greases (FOG) in sewerage networks have been widely documented over the last ten years.    


Improved management of FOG into the infrastructure and energy recovery could improve water industry resilience.  In order to build the case for co-digestion, there is a need to conduct research to prove its feasibility and evaluate the most sustainable way to utilise FOG.

  






POSITION CLOSED

at Cranfield University

 Eliminating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Wastewater Treatment 

Sponsored by Severn Trent Water

 An unintended consequence of biological wastewater treatment is the emission of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. Further, natural and induced biological activity in biosolids also results in further emissions such that wastewater treatment works contains a number of points sources were greenhouse gases will be emitted.

  

 There is need to establish both (a) future flowsheets that can deliver operational carbon neutrality to ensure future development work is focussed towards the right technologies and (2) establish a basis to reduce GCG emission from existing infrastructure so that emissions can be minimised whilst the translation to zero net emission is delivered.  


POSITION CLOSED

at Cranfield University

 Taking 20th Century Drinking Water Treatment Assets into the 21st Century 

Sponsored by Thames Water

 Water infrastructure assets are ageing, regulations are getting tighter, populations are growing, and climate change may change what we can expect raw water to be. The appetite for customers and government to fund a massive change to infrastructure seems low. This critical combination of time, environmental and political changes requires deep intellectual study to resolve.  

  

 The overall challenges is to establish a basis to deliver effective drinking water production against future challenges.



POSITION CLOSED

at Cranfield University

 Delivering a Resilient Approach to Tertiary Phosphorus  Removal from Wastewater 

Sponsored by numerous UK Water Companies

 The dosing of metal salts, coagulation, remains the most efficient commercially available process to remove phosphorus to very low levels that are being increasingly expected. It is then critical to optimise the coagulation-flocculation process in order to remove P from wastewater to very low levels sustainably.  


 The overall challenge is to develop a best practice approach for the tertiary P coagulation. This is framed within the context of understanding how to best utilise and integrate with the existing infrastructure whilst delivering a robust and resilient solution.  


POSITION CLOSED

PHD PROJECTS FOR OCTOBER 2019 START

at University of Sheffield

Service Reservoir Integrity

 Sponsored by Welsh Water

The condition and performance of service reservoirs is critical in protecting the safety of drinking water. However, currently the maintenance of these structure is purely time based as there are no suitable ways of monitoring their condition or performance. 

 

The project will make substantive contributions in advancing the application of online water quality instrumentation and data analytics.     





POSITION CLOSED


at University of Sheffield

Drinking water distribution systems water quality big data analytics 

Sponsored by Siemens

 High resolution monitoring is now sufficiently reliable that it should be integral to derivation of information from data through the building and running of analytics that can be used proactively to make management more cost-efficient and effective. 


  The ultimate outcome of this work will be to determine how water quality sensor deployment can deliver optimal value to a water company operating its distribution network. 



POSITION CLOSED

at University of Sheffield

Understanding Transients in Water Distribution Systems 

Sponsored by Anglian Water

  Hydraulic transients are known to exist in water distribution systems (WDS) and have the potential to case significant failures; whether that be physical damage to pumps, valves and pipe bursts, or water quality impacts like contaminant ingress or the mobilisation of turbidity producing material from pipe walls. 

This project will:   

Determine what useful network operation and management information can be extracted from the wholesale deployment of high speed pressure sensors in distribution systems. 


POSITION CLOSED

PHD PROJECTS FOR OCTOBER 2019 START

at Newcastle University

 Green Infrastructure: understanding its role in mitigating current and future flood risk in urban areas 

 In England alone, 3.2 million households are located in areas at risk of surface water flooding, with annual damages exceeding £300 million. It is projected that this cost of associated damage could increase by 40% by the 2050s.

 Green infrastructure (GI) can provide a means of reducing the amount of water entering drainage systems via infiltration, interception, transpiration and providing both temporary and more longer-term storage. 

Outcomes from this project will include improved understanding of GI performance; assess long-term performance and costs of GI, including management and maintenance; and aid design of future GI strategies to mitigate climate-induced flood risk in urban areas.


POSITION CLOSED

at Newcastle University

A new paradigm for urban flood design storms accounting for variability in space and time under climate change

The extent and severity of the damage caused by urban floods is a product of both the intensity and duration of the rainfall (variable in space and time) and its interaction with the complex flowpaths of a city, on the surface and below ground (drainage network).  Resilient design of urban drainage under climate change is currently blocked by the lack of a realistic design storm methodology. 

The main objective of this proposed PhD research is therefore to analyse precipitation extremes in a changing climate using high resolution climate model outputs, advanced stochastic modelling methodologies and the CityCAT urban flood modelling system.




POSITION CLOSED 

at Newcastle University

Sub-surface impacts of green infrastructure in cities

Urban populations are expected to increase to nearly 70% of the global population by 2050.  As natural regions are enveloped by urban development, land cover changes alter hydrologic responses of watersheds that drain these regions.  Management strategies have sought to apply infiltration-based green infrastructure (GI) to mimic natural hydraulic regimes, often without a full understanding of subsurface hydrologic processes.  

This project would connect newly installed observation networks to existing urban hydrology data networks with a focus on the role of subsurface processes to characterize subsurface changes attributed to GI. Outcomes from this project will improve our understanding of the role of GI in urban hydrologic processes.

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